Is this working? My new paper in the AJHM

Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine coverMy paper entitled “Is this working? The importance of outcome measures in herbal & naturopathic practice” has just been published in the most recent issue of the Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine (Volume 27 Issue 3, September 2015). Continue reading for the abstract of the paper, and a special offer for practitioners.

The commentary piece, based upon my presentation at the 9th International Conference on Herbal Medicine, introduces practitioners to the concept of outcome measures, discusses their nature, and points out some of the benefits as well as barriers to their widespread use in clinic.

If you are an NHAA member you can access the journal for free on their website – click here to access. The abstract is at the bottom of this post.

Special Offer for Practitioners!

Due to the significant interest generated from my presentation at the Conference, I am developing a workshop to train practitioners in using patient-reported outcome measures in their practice. This workshop will be the first in a series of CPE modules for practitioners, and will launch very soon. For more information – and a FREE GIFT ! – visit my new educational website by clicking the button below.

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Breakspear I, 2015. Is this working? The importance of outcome measures in herbal & naturopathic practice. AJHM 27(3): 93-95

Abstract: An acknowledged strength of herbal and naturopathic medicine is its patient-centred focus, yet critics often state that these disciplines lack evidence of efficacy. Assessing efficacy of the individualised care practices of herbalists and naturopaths is not always an easy process, for clinicians or for researchers. The incorporation of outcome measures, especially patient-reported outcome measures (PROM’s) in clinical practice has the potential to improve the assessment of efficacy at the individual patient level. Additionally, increased use of outcome measures in published case studies may assist in evidence generation which is consistent with the individualised care philosophies inherent to naturopathic and herbal medicine. This commentary piece will introduce the reader to the concept of outcome measures, discuss their nature, and point out some of the benefits as well as barriers to their widespread use.

Copyright Ian Breakspear, 2014